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20120901
20120930
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KTVU (FOX) 17
KICU 5
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English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
made in alerting the public when a fire erupted inside the chevron refinery. ktvu's rob roth is live with the steps they say are being taken to protect the public. rob? >> reporter: a piece of pipe may be a key piece in determining what caused the explosion here at the chevron refinery. >> reporter: investigators are looking at a 8-foot section of pipe. >> working with cal-osha and we expect it to be delivered to a lab today. >> reporter: officials described the pipe as thin but wouldn't say what caused the condition. they said what they will look for. >> thickness measurements taken, did they have a good program, using industry standers. >> reporter: they called a special meeting with officials investigating the explosion. >> not just about corroding pipe, about the maintenance, when you replace equipment. >> reporter: they are also focused on failures in the alert system warning the public and wants chevron to pay to upgrade the system. we are also reviewing efforts to improve the data. >>> the plume sent 17,000 people to the hospital. the reports at the time were the air quality
in the baseball season, right now the giants are in first place and the a's have the second best record. rob roth is here. rob? >> reporter: the solseium is clearing out -- coliseum is clearing out, this is an exciting time for baseball fans on both sides of the bay. >> reporter: a's fans have a lot to cheer about these days. so do giants fans. the two bay area baseball teams were both playing at home this afternoon at the same time but they have something else in common if the season ended today both teams would make the playoffs. >> i think that it is terrific for the bay area but i have to root for the a's. >> i am rooting for the a's. i think that they be a better chance than the giants. the giants will probably fade. >> reporter: the season still have a month to go but for fans in the bay area, another bay bridge world series is a nice fantasy. >> all of a sussen it is like -- sudden it is like we are winning everything. >> brings more money to the cities and maybe we will have a bay to bay world series. >> reporter: will clark remembers the excitement of facing the a's in 1989 world series.
men. that attack has the muslim community in the bay area concerned. ktvu's rob roth tells us what they are worried about. rob? >> reporter: frank, at this mosque dozens of people are gathered inside for the evening prayer, just starting now. on a day when many are saddened and concerned. >> reporter: at the conclusion of the afternoon bay, they told us their thoughts are with the families of the four americans and they feel it may feed the stereo tape. >> this feeds into the image of the muslims of being people of terror. people that deal with things violently. >> reporter: they say the fabric of islam is peace. >> you don't commit violence in his name. that is a clear position they have taken for decades now. >> condemns killing anyone for any reason at all. >> reporter: when a terrorist group commits violence they feel they must defend their religion. >> i wish we could talk about more positive things. >> reporter: it is not clear whether the attacks were a planned terrorist attack. they say killing is not the solution. >> they can express their resentment to the movies in a non
there are four other major events going on in san francisco. ktvu's rob roth is here now with that and when tickets will go on sale. rob? >> reporter: the buzz is building here at at&t park. giant post season tickets went on sale today, the first wave did as san francisco gets ready for the playoffs. >> runner goes. line drive. pagan. that is it. >> reporter: from the catch to the cash here at the giants dugout, people were getting a jump on october baseball. tickets for the division series went on sale today for season ticket holders. the public can request tickets online tomorrow. $60 up to $420. >> the amount of inventory is more scarce. >> i think we will get tickets. may not be the seats we want. >> reporter: the success of the giants ripples out, success for restaurants and bars throughout the city. especially near at&t park. >> energy, excitement, fun. people want to be a part of the scene. >> reporter: right now the giants will play at home october 6-7. that is the same weekend san francisco hosts fleet week, featuring the blue angels, the america's cup, the blue grass festival and
of the chevron refinery fire last month. ktvu's rob roth tells us about all the investigations going on along with special meeting today. rob? >> reporter: 5 separate investigations are going on here that chevron refinery and much of the focus is on improving what some call a substandard air pollution monitoring system. >> reporter: they called a special meeting to discuss last month's fire at the chevron refinery and its after math. the fire sent 15,000 residents to hospitals, most with respiratory problems even though they said the samples were safe. >> the community want to see more air monitoring so the public can understand what is in the air. >> reporter: they also hope to establish a better community alert system and perhaps use a weather balloon to catch samples high in the atmosphere. >> we always reviewing efforts to improve air quality and imform the public. >> we -- inform the public. >> we may get what we should have had. >> reporter: the epa, cal-osha, and chevron are investigating along with the federal chemical safety board. one area of concern? >> looking at the issue of the
for drastic changes. ktvu's rob roth has more. >> reporter: the city college of san francisco board of trustees will meet in an hour. what they will hear is a blueprint for digging out of a financial hole that is threatening their survival. >> reporter: city college of san francisco students are feeling the pinch. 700 classes cut this year. >> i cannot get the classes i wanted earlier this year. there is a high demand. >> reporter: city college of san francisco must make more changes or risk losing its accreditation. >> the future of city college of san francisco is at stake. >> reporter: among the proposals is to close the church street campus that houses night classes and reduce teachers, counselors and clerical workers. he is worried about what might happen. >> i am concerned about not having a job. >> there is a great concern about stability and fewer teachers and fewer teachers to do the work of the whole college. >>> the proposals come after a report in july which found numerous deficiencies. >> people are working hard to comply with the report. >> reporter: the college is co
the men and women who -- tonight is an exception as rob roth reports our good friend and long time chief photographer john mckenzie is retiring after 38 years at channel 2. >> john mckenzie out with a camera and tripod chances are everything will come out perfect. >> on every story there's one picture that tells that story. >> every day for the past 34 years john mack as we call him has somehow managed to finds that picture. but this story on wednesday was reporter would be his last. john mckenzie is retiring. you may not know mack's name or know his face but you will remember his work. we do. in 1989 mckenzie and reporter went out with the coast guard to shoot rescue training. >> it was pretty much terrifying. >> the boat went down, the camera came up and dislocated my collarbone. that hurt. >> wild fires are one of the most dangerous stories a television crew can cover. mack never shied away. >> i knew we were in trouble when the firemen started running around screaming at each other. >> reporter: he may not be as well known as his brother. this time both brothers were in front of the
the words killers on that station. rob roth live in the city now with why they are so angry, rob. >> reporter: frank here at the mission district, police station the graffiti has been cleared off. the target of a protest over an officer involved shooting as police and community groups try to keep gang violence from getting worse. >> reporter: with gang tensions simmering police are stepping up patrols in the mission district tonight but they'll also be watching out for their own stations. last night a group of protesters some called an anarchist marched through the mission district and spray painted the word killer on the station doors. a brief stand out followed. the protesters then moved on without any other vandalism. early this morning, work crewed cleaned up the spray painted insult. >> the police are here to protect and serve the public. it's not good to see that. >> reporter: the protest was in response to a shooting earlier a few blocks away in which no one was killed. police say plained clothes officers spotted a suspected gang member on parol for assault with a deadly w
and actually closed the system to passengers for eight days. but as rob roth reported at the time. some of the trains did keep running. >> while dozens and dozens of b.a.r.t. cars sat idle at the richmond yard, some trains were still on the move. no this is not a mirage to help maintain the system, each day b.a.r.t. has a few trains coming and going. >> this morning we got on at the lake merritt station and headed through the tube to san francisco. one of b.a.r.t.'s biggest concerns is the train tracks. if the trains don't run the track can build rust. b.a.r.t. calls it polishing the tracks. if less rust would build up workers would have to grind it down. and that's 100 miles worth of grinding. no one we spoke with even wanted to guess how long that would take. a handful of nonunion workers were in the usual places, checking the system, troubleshooting normally this room would be packed. >> we have the capability of controlling all the stations. we everyone have seismic alarms that come in from various locations. in order to maintain the integrity of the system we have to keep the contr
for half a century. ktvu 's rob roth tells us it was a favorite for politicians even frank sinatra. the drinks kept coming, the food smelled great and the goodbyes kept coming. owner and chef mateo crobello says the closure is a cause of the economy. >> i've been trying to keep it open but now it's come to an end. it's gotten expensive. >> reporter: so people came out for one last visit. >> it's the only restaurant in the world that i ever really took home that i ordered and could not finish. that's cantelonni in the world. >> reporter: that's where tim mullens remembered coming when he was a little boy. >> you felt like you were home when you were having your meal. >> it's just very alive and the people are nice. >> reporter: the original owner also dropped in telling stories of famous customers such as frank sinatra. >> when he could come to the city and he would come and see me. but you know sinatra wants to eat at 2:00 in the morning. >> reporter: cesars never tried to be trendy perhaps that was his quest and in the ends perhaps its curse. but 56 years is a long life in the res
county. it's a story we've been following for you all week. rob roth continues our coverage from fairfield that's where people who want to help the officers family have a unique way to do so, right bob. >> reporter: we're inside jump highway and as you can see there's a lot of jumping and running around going on at this indoor trampoline park. on sunday the owners are holding a fundraiser here for the family of california highway patrol officer kenney youngstrom as the community steps up to support a fallen officer. on sunday those who come here will be bouncing for a worthy cause. the owners say they will donate all the proceeds that day to the family of officer youngstrom who lives near by. >> it's one of the ways we can help give back. these guys put their life on the line for us each and every day. >> reporter: officer youngstrom was shot and later died. >> not a lot of times i don't get welt up, it's very difficult. it's starting to happen now just talking. >> reporter: it's an organization that provides money, scholarships and a strong shoulder to an on for the families of
. ktvu's rob roth visited the new headquarters today and tells us volunteers are hoping to keep its new location a secret. >> reporter: president obama's new campaign office reopened today. >> it's very, very safe. >> reporter: the previous store front office on 17th and telegraph is now boarded up. >> we had a large window and it was very, very public. >> reporter: about two weeks ago six activists walked into the campaign office, scuffled with workers and refused to leave. they're demanding president oe baa ma drop all sarges against bradley manning accused of giving classified material to wikileaks. this after a rock smashed the front window a year ago. and word of another protest on thursday night. the obama campaign say it is reason for the move was not because of the protests but because of space. this office they say is larger. >> city council member de la fuente says they cannot afford the clean up. they haven't decided yet if there will be a viewing party here thursday night. in oakland, rob roth, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> police in south san francisco say a 14-year-old boy was
if there will be a viewing party here thursday night. in oakland, rob roth, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> police in south san francisco say a 14-year-old boy was arrested at school today with a gun and ammunition. police say the eighth grader was taken into custody in class. the teen was booked into san mateo county juvenile hall. police have not said anything about a motive or identified the school. >>> a group that is attacks on sodas are suing the city of richmond over it's dispute. the law requires mass mailings to include funding information right there on the front page. and the coalition is funded mostly by the american beverage association. >>> mcdonalds today announced plans to open its first vegetarian friendly restaurant in india. the restaurants will only serve vegetarian food. no word on when or how many restaurants will actually be opened. >>> it has been nearly two years since the san bruno pipeline explosion that killed 10 people and injured several others. hill accused the utility of putting profit over safety. but pg & e says it has spent 1- 1/2 million dollars on safety improvements since
serving up meals for half a century. ktvu 's rob roth tells us it was a favorite for politicians even frank sinatra. the drinks kept coming, the food smelled great and the goodbyes kept coming. owner and chef mateo crobello says the closure is a cause of the economy. >> i've been trying to keep it open but now it's come to an end. it's gotten expensive. >> reporter: so people came out for one last visit. >> it's the only restaurant in the world that i ever really took home that i ordered and could not finish. that's cantelonni in the world. >> reporter: that's where tim mullens remembered coming when he was a little boy. >> you felt like you were home when you were having your meal. >> it's just very alive and the people are nice. >> reporter: the original owner also dropped in telling stories of famous customers such as frank sinatra. >> when he could come to the city and he would come and see me. but you know sinatra wants to eat at 2:00 in the morning. >> reporter: cesars never tried to be trendy perhaps that was his quest and in the ends perhaps its curse. but 56 years is a long l
for postseason baseball. rob roth said that's not the only reason they are expecting a flood of people the first weekend in october. >> runner goes, line drive, that's it. >> reporter: from the catch to the cash here at giant's dug out people getting a jump on october baseball. >> all giants out. >> reporter: tickets went on sale online today but only for season ticket holders, the general public can start requesting them tomorrow also online. price range, $60 for nose bleed seats up to $420. >> we have 29,000 people ticket holders now. the amount of inhave not vein torry is less. >> i think we will get tickets and may not be the ones we want but any time we are in the park is great. >> reporter: the success of the giants ripples out. it means success for restaurants and bars throughout the ty and near the park. >> mostly the energy and the excitement and the fun. people come down because they just want to be a part of it. >> reporter: it appears the giants will play at home the weekend of october 6th and 7th if those dates sound familiar it's that's the same weekend san francisco will hos
that was destroyed during the 1906 quake. rob roth is in the city and say what they found and also why there are no plans to dig it up. >> reporter: for history buffs its like a piece of buried treasure. to get focused behind me is the current city hall. over here with the asian art museum that was the old city hall that took up a block across what's now hyde street to that february. beyond that where that dirt is that's where a piece of history was found. work crews were about to plant new trees. >> they found they kept hitting brick. >> reporter: these. they are part of the foundation of what was once san francisco's city hall. destroy bid the 1906 quake. it took 25 years to build it and it's 300-foot high dome. construction started in 1872. it was the largest one. >> there were contract disputes . >> reporter: it was just nine when an april 18th. 1906 the quake rocked the city. the it wasn't reinforced it fell away. >> reporter: this piece of foundation is still very much intact. >> it still feels solid like it's not -- it doesn't fall apart in your hands. >> the tricks -- were
rarely get to meet the men and women who -- tonight is an exception as rob roth reports our good friend and long time chief photographer john mckenzie is retiring after 38 years at channel 2. >> john mckenzie out with a camera and tripod chances are everything will come out perfect. >> on every story there's one picture that tells that story. >> every day for the past 34 years john mack as we call him has somehow managed to finds that picture. but this story on wednesday was reporter would be his last. john mckenzie is retiring. you may not know mack's name or know his face but you will remember his work. we do. in 1989 mckenzie and reporter went out with the coast guard to shoot rescue training. >> it was pretty much terrifying. >> the boat went down, the camera came up and dislocated my collarbone. that hurt. >> wild fires are one of the most dangerous stories a television crew can cover. mack never shied away. >> i knew we were in trouble when the firemen started running around screaming at each other. >> reporter: he may not be as well known as his brother. this time both brothers w
killed earlier this week. rob roth shows us how communities and organizations are really stepping up to the plate to help the officer's family. >> >>> those who come will be bouncing for a worthy cause. the owners say they will donate all the proceeds that day to the widow and four children of an officer. >> they put their lives on the line. the death is sparking support from sad residents. >> trying to get happy now. >> reporter: the sheriff's deputy helps run the 100 club. it's an organization that helps provide -- fallen peace officers. they have given the officer's family $15,000 and a promise. >> we are here for you and anything you call us we will be there. >> reporter: shannon knows what it's like to need the support of the 100 club. it was four years ago her husband was shot to death by the estranged husband of a salon owner. he left three small children. the club has been a great help. >> they always call and check on me. that's so important. >> reporter: are the fundraiser goes on all day sun and local businesses are also helping putting on a silent auction. in fairfiel
support for california highway patrol officer killed earlier this week. rob roth shows us how communities and organizations are really stepping up to the plate to help the officer's family. >> >>> those who come will be bouncing for a worthy cause. the owners say they will donate all the proceeds that day to the widow and four children of an officer. >> they put their lives on the line. the death is sparking support from sad residents. >> trying to get happy now. >> reporter: the sheriff's deputy helps run the 100 club. it's an organization that helps provide -- fallen peace officers. they have given the officer's family $15,000 and a promise. >> we are here for you and anything you call us we will be there. >> reporter: shannon knows what it's like to need the support of the 100 club. it was four years ago her husband was shot to death by the estranged husband of a salon owner. he left three small children. the club has been a great help. >> they always call and check on me. that's so important. >> reporter: are the fundraiser goes on all day sun and local businesses are also helping
. reporting live in san francisco, rob roth, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> a southern california claims it's a case of discrimination by an american airlines pilot against their son who has downs syndrome. they say the pilot told them they could not board a flight home because their son was a security risk. american airlines says he was agitated and running around the gate area. but the family says it was because they had upgraded to first class. >> i was concerned that my son was going to be in first class, and i think the pilot felt that my type of son, my disabled, downs syndrome son, shouldn't be in first class. >> this is video they took of their son playing with his hat at the gate. they say they plan to file a lawsuit. >>> a man wearing a ski mask and a bathrobe opened fire at a midnight rally for quebec's new premier, killing one person. the new premier looked stunned. the premier was not harmed but one person was killed. the suspect was a 62-year-old man, who also hit a small fire. as the suspect was being taken away by officers, he shouted in french, quote, the english are waking up. >>>
of activity the occupy camp in san francisco is gone tonight. rob roth is live with how even some occupy activists say it has lost its way. >> reporter: here at the cormier of market and main, a fence now sits where homeless people and occupy san francisco used to sleep. next to the fence a few members of occupy san francisco were handing out flyers about the occupy movement. they agreed many in the area that the camp established here in front of the federal reserve bank wasn't able to sustain any political mess appling. >> it be kim something that wasn't attractive from any standpoint. it was intimidating. >> reporter: people who walked by say they are glad as it had gone to a trouble spot. >> i didn't like walking through there. there is just so many people and it's dirty and just didn't like it. >> reporter: two nights ago place cleared out. the sidewalk needs repair they say, 45 people were arrested. it was no longer a free speech zone. >> this was illegal lodging in the tents, and it was camp -- not part of the freedom of speech act. >> reporter: last night a group police called
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)

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